An analysis of the dialogue between plato and socrates in the crito by plato

Also, Socrates should not worry about the risk or the financial cost to his friends; these they are willing to pay, and they have also arranged to find Socrates a pleasant life in exile.

By appealing to the opinion of "the many," Crito seems to be committing the Ad Populum Fallacy i. Also, the very confusion a reader finds in wading through these arguments is a great motivation to sort through issues of justice and law oneself.

Crito explains that he admires the peaceful manner in which Socrates has heretofore lived and the level of calm that Socrates displays in the face of death.

Socrates seems quite willing to await his imminent execution, and so Crito presents as many arguments as he can to persuade Socrates to escape. And shall that be the premiss of our argument? What you say here about virtue and justice and institutions and laws being the best things among men?

Although most people think it natural and right to return wrongs done them, Socrates disagrees: But if both the people and the Laws have ruled that Socrates must be executed, either the people are siding with the Laws or the Laws are siding with the people.

What do you say about making a libation out of this cup to any god? Very good; and is not this true, Crito, of other things which we need not separately enumerate?

Plato’s Crito: Analysis

Crito does not allow Socrates to elaborate the meaning of the dream, but only calls him daimonic ; Crito has arrived at this early hour to save Socrates from death. But I would have you consider, Crito, whether you really mean what you are saying.

More honourable than the body? At the same time he handed the cup to Socrates, who in the easiest and gentlest manner, without the least fear or change of color or feature, looking at the man with all his eyes, Echecrates, as his manner was, took the cup and said: Socrates answers first that one should not worry about public opinion, but only listen to wise and expert advice.

But I do not think that the ship will be here until to-morrow; this I infer from a vision which I had last night, or rather only just now, when you fortunately allowed me to sleep. Were not the laws, which have the charge of education, right in commanding your father to train you in music and gymnastic?

At line fifty, Socrates executes these foundations to destroy and make untenable the petition that he may rightfully dissent: Think not of life and children first, and of justice afterwards, but of justice first, that you may be justified before the princes of the world below.

One of Crito's strongest arguments in favor of escape comes at 45c, where Crito suggests that Socrates would be abetting the wrong-doing of his enemies in following through with their wishes.

For doing evil to another is the same as injuring him? Why have you come at this hour, Crito? Socrates seems to set up an Open Argument: You, my good friend, who are experienced in these matters, shall give me directions how I am to proceed.

Now, if you fear on our account, be at ease; for in order to save you, we ought surely to run this, or even a greater risk; be persuaded, then, and do as I say. No man should bring children into the world who is unwilling to persevere to the end in their nurture and education.

Crito Analysis

For you never went out of the city either to see the games, except once when you went to the Isthmus, or to any other place unless when you were on military service; nor did you travel as other men do.

However, it is highly debatable how far one can truly separate the laws of a state from the people who apply them. Socrates answers first that one should not worry about public opinion, but only listen to wise and expert advice.

Crito further argues that a father like Socrates has an obligation to nurture and educate his children and should avoid orphaning them if at all possible. And so the Practical Question in this dialogue becomes: But in reality they can do neither; for they cannot make a man either wise or foolish; and whatever they do is the result of chance.

I have been watching with amazement your peaceful slumbers; and for that reason I did not awake you, because I wished to minimize the pain. From these premisses I proceed to argue the question whether I ought or ought not to try and escape without the consent of the Athenians: Apollodorus, who had been weeping all the time, broke out in a loud cry which made cowards of us all.PLATO: CRITO.

LECTURE NOTES. September 16, The story: The main text of the dialogue is Socrates’ analysis of Crito’s arguments why he should escape from prison. Crito is one of the "jailhouse dialogues," coming in dramatic sequence after the Apology and before the Phaedo.

Analysis of Plato's Crito. The life of Socrates provides one example of a someone who seeks a justification for his or her moral actions. Socrates tries to use REASON (rather than the values embedded in his culture) to determine whether an action is right or wrong.

Analysis of Plato's Crito. The life of Socrates provides one example of a someone who seeks a justification for his or her moral actions. Socrates tries to use REASON (rather than the values embedded in his culture) to determine whether an action is right or wrong.

Analysis of Crito The question is raised within the dialogue between Socrates and Crito concerning civil disobedience. Crito has the desire, the means, and many compelling reasons with which he tries to convince the condemned to acquiesce in the plan to avoid his imminent death.

PLATO: CRITO. LECTURE NOTES. September 16, The story: The main text of the dialogue is Socrates’ analysis of Crito’s arguments why he should escape from prison.

Crito Analysis

Crito is one of the "jailhouse dialogues," coming in dramatic sequence after the Apology and before the Phaedo. The dialogue is a conversation between Socrates and his wealthy friend Crito on justice and injustice, as well as the appropriate response to injustice.

During the conversation, Crito provides arguments in favor of Socrates’ escape from prison.

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An analysis of the dialogue between plato and socrates in the crito by plato
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